Why a trio of articles on tribes + fire = essential reading

Wildfires are a permanent part of the landscape. Climate change – and a host of “positive” ecological feedback loops (a positive loop is one that is self-reinforcing; a negative loop indicates reactions that move in the opposite direction) – mean that things will only get worse, not better, unless we enact radical changes. We have […]

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Los Ancianos – Honoring the Old Ones

This Spring, before the heatwaves began scorching our lands out West, my girlfriend Toni and I toured some of the outstanding scenery of Nevada, Utah, Arizona, and California. We had a little over a week, and so we aimed the van towards Zion and Bryce National Parks, the Valley of Fire, and Death Valley. We […]

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The Language of Silence

Why America’s oldest lake is in so much trouble Recently during a lunchtime conversation with a well-read, well-traveled friend, I mentioned Clear Lake. “Where’s that?” she asked. “California’s largest lake?” I responded, doing a quick calculation of how much contextual information I needed to share. “It’s in Lake County, a few hours from here. I […]

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Cultural burning = #GoodFire.

A primer on why we need more good fire. This week, another piece on the importance of indigenous fire knowledge and techniques went live online. I’m thrilled, because after working on this article for weeks, it appeared in Slate, a news magazine that usually carries more popular culture pieces. Even more exciting: the preponderance of […]

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Precipitate

Among the varied (and rather eccentric) reasons I retain a post office box in Mendocino county is this: I get to participate in a county-wide community of poets. For over ten years I have shared readings and writings with this community in art galleries, museums, libraries, conference rooms, and on air. Our community is largely […]

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